A US venture capital firm has put up funds to help Australian company Deputy expand its workforce management cloud-based software business.

The software, already in use by clients in 70 countries, simplifies time-consuming tasks such as rostering, arranging leave, finding emergency cover, or sourcing workers at short notice for maintenance or repairs, according to a report by Nine Finance.

“One day, Deputy will be a household word when people come to consider what they are going to be doing, who they are going to be doing it with, when they’re going to be doing it – and they will generally have a proper and meaningful relationship with their place of work,” Deputy co-founder Steve Shelley said.

Shift workers comprise nearly 60 per cent of the world’s labour force, and are growing in number as aged care providers and staff move away from traditional full time contracts and opt for greater flexibility of work hours.

Mr Shelly said despite the change in workforce structure, the technology supporting both staff and employers often does not integrate time tracking and scheduling.

Deputy’s software can track staff attendance, time worked and location, and forward the information to payroll, saving time for both employers and staff.

Staff can use the software to swap shifts, notify their boss that they are sick, or apply for leave – all through using a smartphone or tablet.

The employer can check on staff via a smartphone, even if the employer is on holiday overseas.

Deputy has received $25 million from Boston-based venture capital firm OpenView to expand its operations.